Bitter really is better with neem

 In General, Neem in the News
For centuries, herbalists have recommended bitter herbs for a wide variety of ailments. In fact, willow bark — a natural source of aspirin — is an extremely bitter herb before it was synthesized.
 
A new study from the University of Missouri was published in the January 2017 issue of Plant Foods Human Nutrition. It looked at ways to reduce the bitterness of neem. The goal, of course, was to make it easier to drink neem tea while not changing the compounds that make it so effective.
 
Once again, the science is very complicated, but the results were clear. Using “adsorbants” to de-bitterize neem tea reduced the compounds believed to make it an effective medicinal herb. One extraction process, for instance, completely removed quercetin from neem tea. Quercetin, of course, is a neem compound that is an important flavonol and antioxidant credited with many benefits.
 
The de-bittering also led to a loss of sesquiterpenes, ketones and acids in the neem tea. These bio-active compounds also are associated with neem’s multiple medicinal qualities. (Scientists, however, have just begun to discover which compound has what effective.)
 
Many people – particularly those with joint or tummy issues – actually like to learn to like the taste of neem. That’s usually because it has such a significant impact on the way they feel, generally within a matter of days
 
For others, though, the answer is easy – neem supplements. Naturally, we think our Six-Way Neem Capsules – made with supercritical and hydrophobic extracts of neem as well as raw materials – are the best choice. We do carry three different neem capsules – plus raw materials – so you can select which product is best for you. Learn more at Which Neem Supplement is Best for Me?
IMPORTANT NOTE: This research is presented for educational purposes only. Neem Tree Farms does not sell products which are intended to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any disease.
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